International Conference Reveals New Data

Last month, experts from around the world gathered to discuss the very latest studies, findings, and clinical trials in the field of Alzheimer’s Disease and other dementias. Here is just one highlight among many. (repinted from the website www.alz.org)

LOS ANGELES, JULY 14, 2019 — Research presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference (AAIC) 2019 in Los Angeles suggests adopting multiple healthy lifestyle habits provides high levels of benefit for brain health, and may offset genetic and environmental risks of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias. These reports were some of the most promising and hopeful among a record number of scientific studies presented at the conference that use diverse approaches to uncover the causes, progression, risk factors, treatment and prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias.

Lifestyle Interventions Can Offset Elevated Alzheimer’s Risk
New research reported at AAIC 2019 suggests that adopting multiple healthy lifestyle choices, including healthy diet, not smoking, regular exercise and cognitive stimulation, may decrease the risk of cognitive decline and dementia. One study reported that participants who adopted four or five low-risk lifestyle factors had about 60% lower risk of Alzheimer’s dementia compared with participants who did not follow any or only one of the low-risk factors.

Two studies showed that actionable lifestyle changes could potentially counteract elevated risk for Alzheimer’s disease. In one report, researchers showed that participants with a high genetic risk for Alzheimer’s following a “favorable” lifestyle had a 32% lower risk of all-cause dementia compared with an “unfavorable” lifestyle. Another report confirmed that living in locations with high air pollution increased the risk for Alzheimer’s and other dementias. However, it also found that older women with higher cognitive reserve – based on cognitive function scores, years of education, job status and physical activity – only showed a 21% increased environmental risk compared with a 113% increased risk for those with lower cognitive reserve.

Other new data presented at the conference included: Advances in emerging blood biomarkers that may support early detection, improved diagnosis and enhanced clinical trial recruitment for Alzheimer’s and other dementias, and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Visit www.alz.org to read more about the conference and all that the Alzheimer’s Association is doing to study, treat, and find a cure.